Form of Work
Książki
(3)
Status
only on-site
(3)
available
(1)
Branch
Wypożyczalnie
(1)
Czytelnie
(3)
Author
Hilton Boyd
(1)
Mazur Zbigniew (1961- )
(1)
Turner Graeme
(1)
Wawrzyczek Irmina
(1)
Year
2000 - 2009
(2)
1990 - 1999
(1)
Country
Kiribati
(1)
Poland
(1)
United Kingdom
(1)
Language
Polish
(2)
English
(1)
Subject
KULTURA MASOWA
(2)
WIELKA BRYTANIA
(2)
ŚRODKI MASOWEGO PRZEKAZU
(1)
Subject: time
1701-
(1)
1801-
(1)
Subject: place
WIELKA BRYTANIA
(1)
3 results Filter
No cover
Book
In basket
British cultural studies : an introduction / Graeme Turner. - 2nd ed. - London, New York : Routledge, 1996. - VI, [1], 258 s. ; 22 cm.
"British Cultural Studies" is a comprehensive introduction to the British tradition of cultural studies. Graeme Turner offers an accessible overview to the central themes that have informed British cultural studies; language, semiotics, Marxism and ideology, individualism and subjectivity and discourse. Presenting a history of British cultural studies and focusing on the work of such pioneers as Raymond Williams, Richard Hoggart, E.P. Thompson, Stuart Hall and the Birmingham Centre for Contemporary Cultural Studies, the second edition is fully revised to include new issues in cultural studies and to update key debates and references. New sections include: The influence of postmodernism, The politics of pleasure identified with the 'New Revisionism', Foucault and discourse, The politics of cultural studies, Gender and Race in the history of British Cultural Studies. A fully updated and comprehensive bibliography.
This item is available in one branch. Expand information to see details.
Czytelnie
Copies are only available in the library: sygn. 11193 XXIV.3 [Czytelnia A] (1 egz.)
No cover
Book
In basket
(Researching British Culture Topics and Approaches)
Bibliogr. przy pracach.
The essays cover aspects of British politics, media, music, film and popular culture at the close of the XX century. They indicate that the Labour Party's concept of "New" Britain introduced for political marketing is justified by significant qualitative transformations of British culture. In their critical interpretations the authors apply key theories and methods of the field to empirical material and demonstrate the importance of an interdisciplinary approach to cultural analysis.
This item is available in one branch. Expand information to see details.
Czytelnie
Copies are only available in the library: sygn. 10937 XXIV.5 [Czytelnia A] (1 egz.)
Book
In basket
A mad, bad and dangerous people? : England 1783-1846 / Boyd Hilton. - Oxford : New York : Oxford University Press, 2006. - XXV, [1], 757 s., [12] s. tabl. : il. ; 24 cm.
(New Oxford History of England)
Bibliogr. s. 664-723. Indeks.
In 1783 England felt down and out, having just lost the bulk of its American colonies. By 1846 it was once more a great imperial nation, as well as the world's strongest power and dominant economy. It the meantime the country survived a decade of invasion fears, and emerged victorious from more than twenty years of 'war to death' against Napoleonic France, while the Romantic movement brought English writers and artists to the forefront of European attention for the first time. But if Britain's external fortunes were in the ascendant, the situation at home remained fraught with peril, with the most prolonged period of social unrest since the seventeenth century. Population was growing at a rate not experienced by any comparable former society, and manufacturing towns were mushrooming into filthy, disease-ridden, gin-sodden hell-holes, in turn provoking the phantasmagoria of a mad, bad and dangerous people. The governing class, in constant fear of a French-style revolution, was forced to engage with social problems to an unprecedented extent, one reason why, by the mid-nineteenth century, the seed of a settled two-party system and of a more socially interventionist state were both in evidence. At the same time the country experienced a great religious revival, very loosely described under the heading 'evangelicalism'. Slowly but surely, the raffish and rakish style of eighteenth-century society, having reached a peak in the Regency, was succumbing to the new norms of respectability popular known as 'Victorianism'.
This item is available in 2 branches. Expand the list to see details.
Wypożyczalnie
There are copies available to loan: sygn. P.12189 XXIV.1 [Wypożyczalnia A] (1 egz.)
Czytelnie
Copies are only available in the library: sygn. 13313 XXIV.1 [Czytelnia A] (1 egz.)
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