Form of Work
Książki
(4)
Status
only on-site
(3)
available
(1)
Branch
Magazyny
(1)
Czytelnie
(3)
Author
Black Jeremy
(1)
Coleman David
(1)
Goldin Ian (1955- )
(1)
Hansen Randall
(1)
MacRaild Donald M
(1)
Reinert Kenneth A
(1)
Salt John (1942- )
(1)
Year
2010 - 2019
(1)
2000 - 2009
(2)
1990 - 1999
(1)
Country
Kiribati
(3)
United States
(1)
Language
Polish
(3)
English
(1)
Subject
WIELKA BRYTANIA
(2)
GLOBALIZACJA
(1)
GOSPODARKA
(1)
MIGRACJE
(1)
OBYWATELSTWO
(1)
WZROST GOSPODARCZY
(1)
Genre/Form
DANE STATYSTYCZNE
(1)
PODRĘCZNIKI AKADEMICKIE
(1)
4 results Filter
Book
In basket
Bibliogr. s. 285-318. Indeksy.
Globalization and its relation to poverty reduction and development are not well understood. This book explores the ways in which globalization can overcome poverty or make it worse. The book defines the big historical trends, identifies the main globalization processes--trade, finance, aid, migration, and ideas - and examines how each can contribute to economic development. By considering what helps and what does not, the book presents policy recommendations to make globalization more effective as a vehicle for shared growth and poverty reduction. It will be of interest to students, researchers, and anyone concerned with the effects of globalization on international development.
This item is available in one branch. Expand information to see details.
Magazyny
There are copies available to loan: sygn. 14040 [Magazyn 2] (1 egz.)
No cover
Book
In basket
This is the only textbook which offers students a complete picture of Britain's population structure and an informed discussion of such topics as: the pressure of numbers on resources; the stagnation of population growth and the problems of an aging population; immigration and racial composition of the population; marriage, divorce, and the future of the family; and how population questions relate to regional problems, including labor migration and inner city depopulation and impoverishment. This study will prove especially useful for civil servants, journalists, and media people.
This item is available in one branch. Expand information to see details.
Czytelnie
Copies are only available in the library: sygn. 11262.XXIV.3 [Czytelnia A] (1 egz.)
No cover
Book
In basket
Nineteenth- century Britain / Jeremy Black, Donald M. MacRaild. - Basingstoke : Palgrave Macmillan, cop. 2003. - XXIII, 349 s. : il. ; 23 cm.
(Palgrave Foundations)
Bibliogr., indeks.
The nineetenth century was a period of striking developments, and subject to a great pressure of change. This process of change is the primary focus of the book. Organised into a series of thematic chapters, Black and MacRaild's wide-ranging text offers the reader an analysis of numerous spheres of human history: politics, empire and warfare; economy, society and population; religion and culture. The book also offers considered treatment of Scotland, Wales and Ireland, with a truly British (as opposed to English) perspective maintained throughout. With numerous illustrations, helpful explanatory tables, boxes and textual inserts, as well as a list of further reading with each chapter, "Ninteetenth Century Britain" is an excellent introductory text book for students of this most vital period in British history.
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Czytelnie
Copies are only available in the library: sygn. 11681.XXIV.3 [Czytelnia A] (1 egz.)
No cover
Book
In basket
In this ground-breaking book, the author draws extensively on archival material and theortical advances in the social sciences literature on citizenship and migration. "Citizenship and Immigration in Postwar Britain" examines the transformation since 1945 of the UK from a homogeneous into a multicultural society. Rejecting a dominant strain of sociological and historical inquiry emphasising state racism, Hansen argues that politicians and civil servants were overall liberal relative to a public, to which it owed its office, and pursued policies that were rational for any liberal democratic politician. He explains the trajectory of British migration and nationality policy - its exceptional liberality until the 1950s, its exceptional restrictiveness after then, and its tortured and seemingly racist definition of citizenship. The combined effect of a 1948 imperial definition of citizenship (adopted independently of immigration) and a primary commitment to migration from the Old Dominions, locked British politicians into a series of policy choices resulting in a migration and nationality regime that was not racist in intention, but was racist in effect. In the context of a liberal elite and an illiberal public, Britain's current restrictive migration policies result not from the faling of its policy-makers but those of its institutions.
This item is available in one branch. Expand information to see details.
Czytelnie
Copies are only available in the library: sygn. 10090.XXIV.1 [Czytelnia A] (1 egz.)
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