Form of Work
Książki
(2)
Status
only on-site
(2)
Branch
Czytelnie
(2)
Author
McLarren Caldwell Janis
(1)
Novak Daniel A
(1)
Year
2000 - 2009
(2)
Country
Kiribati
(2)
Language
Polish
(2)
Subject
LITERATURA ANGIELSKA
(2)
FOTOGRAFIA
(1)
MEDYCYNA
(1)
REALIZM
(1)
2 results Filter
No cover
Book
In basket
(Cambridge Studies in Nineteenth-Century Literature and Culture ; 46)
Index s. 199-201
Although we have come to regard 'clinical' and 'romantic' as oppositional terms, romantic literature and clinical medicine were fed by the same cultural configurations. In the pre-Darwinian nineteenth century, writers and doctors developed an interpretive method that negotiated between literary and scientific knowledge of the natural world. Literary writers produced potent myths that juxtaposed the natural and the supernatural, often disturbing the conventional dualist hierarchy of spirit over flesh. Clinicians developed the two-part history and physical examination, weighing the patient's narrative against the evidence of the body. Examining fiction by Mary Shelley, Carlyle, the Brontës and George Eliot, alongside biomedical lectures, textbooks and articles, Janis McLarren Caldwell demonstrates the similar ways of reading employed by nineteenth-century doctors and imaginative writers and reveals the complexities and creative exchanges of the relationship between literature and medicine.
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Czytelnie
Copies are only available in the library: sygn. 8419 XXIV.1 [Czytelnia A] (1 egz.)
No cover
Book
In basket
(Cambridge Studies in Nineteenth-Century Literature and Culture ; 60)
Index s.223-229
This fascinating account of the relationship between photography and literary realism in Victorian Britain draws on detailed readings of photographs, writings about photography, and fiction by Charles Dickens, George Eliot and Oscar Wilde. While other critics have argued that photography defined what would be 'real' for literary fiction, Daniel A. Novak demonstrates that photography itself was associated with the unreal - with fiction and the literary imagination. Once we acknowledge that manipulation was essential rather than incidental to the project of nineteenth-century realism, our understanding of the relationship between photography and fiction changes in important ways. Novak argues that while realism may seem to make claims to particularity and individuality, both in fiction and in photography, it relies much more on typicality than on perfect reproduction. Illustrated with many photographs, this book represents an important contribution to current debates on the nature of Victorian realism.
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Czytelnie
Copies are only available in the library: sygn. 8417 XXIV.8 [Czytelnia A] (1 egz.)
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